Results Analysis World Junior Championship 2014

It seems that many people all around the world liked my previous  results analyses about the World Championship in Brazil. Now that the World Junior Championship is over and everyone came well back home (besides women who were still flying under the rain in Poland as I wrote this post :p), it is interesting to analyse the results in more details. I therefore made an in-depth analysis of the scores and came up with several graphics and tables. I also improved some analyses and tried some new ones. Please let me know your ideas and suggestions =). As a reminder, you can find the official final results here : Official Final Results.

First of all, I wanted to announce one amazing number extracted from this analysis: 350 markers finished into the MMA and were measured by the measuring team during this world junior championship! Congratulations to all pilots for this high level, but also big thanks to the measuring teams and officials! And one more, 280 tracks were analyzed by the scorers! Big thanks to them too =).

This time I decided to start by an analysis flight by flight in order to have a better view of the championship. Each analysis page is structured as follow: first you will find the tasks, then the top 3 pilots for this flight, and finally a summary of all tasks where a physical marker needed to be dropped. You will see the numbers of markers who finished in MMA, the average score, and  also the number of markers within 10 meters with a little hand-made drawing to represent and show the 10m radius on the target =).

Let’s start with Flight 1 as an example.

Capture d’écran 2014-09-15 à 17.39.41

For this first flight, we had to run a 3DD task and an Hesitation Waltz. The top 3 of this flight is composed of Stefan Peter Schweighofer, Stephanie Bareford and Laure De Coligny. I calculated their average score by dividing the total result of the flight by the number of tasks done on this flight. 11 markers finished in the MMA, with 5 in the 10 meters, and the average score is 188 meters! I represented these markers into the 10 meters area =).

Generally the most interesting flights to analyze are the morning flights, with 4-5 tasks and really flyable winds to reach the targets. Let’s have a look at the second flight of this championship.

Capture d’écran 2014-09-15 à 18.04.19This flight is really impressive just by analyzing the markers dropped. We did 3 physical tasks during this flight, and 99% of markers finished into the MMA! The average score of the FIN by gravity is also really impressive, 18m with 19 markers in the 10 firsts meters! Amazing! The Hesitation Waltz target experienced also a really strong rain of markers with 24 markers into 10 meters!

For the next flights please consult the following files:

Now we have seen each flight one by one, the next graph represents a summary of the distribution of the tasks set by the event director (Zoltan!). We can see that physical tasks with baggies to drop represent 61% of the tasks! Exclusive virtual tasks (Land Run, Race To an Area, XDI, 3DD) represent 21%, and FON/PDG tasks represent only 18% of total tasks. It means that if you wanted to be one of the top pilots, it was not sufficient to know how to reach targets with accuracy, but you also needed to achieve some virtual tasks which requires some mathematical knowledge and some strategy =). We can thank therefore Zoltan Palhegyi, the event director, for the diversity of the tasks.  As a comparison, during the Women World Championship, the distribution of tasks was 75% physical target tasks / 12.5% virtual tasks / 12.5% FON/PDG.

Numbers

Now we can focus on the ranking evolution of the top 10 pilots. We can see here that the 3 winners – Dom, Rokas and myself ^^ – were already in the top 3 after the 6th flight (Dominic even after 2 flights and myself after 3 flights… Rokas came later on but strongly!).

Ranking Evolution

The graph showed also that some pilots were very close to another during the whole competition. I mean there were some pilots fighting in dual, this is what I called in this analysis “pilot battles”. We had three main battles during the championship : the “podium battle” opposing Clément Seigeot (FR) and Dominic Bareford (UK), the “girls battle” opposing Stephanie Bareford (UK) and Laure de Coligny (FR) and finally the “near-podium battle” opposing Kevin Allemand (FR) and Jan Suchy (CZ). As you can notice, there is always a French pilot in the battles… I promise it was not on purpose ^^ It is not my fault if French guys like to fight :p

Battle Seigeot-Dom

I was always very close to Dom and even beyond him once 🙂 Unfortunately we had no 10th flight to reverse the tendency (and I also have to mention that I stupidly missed the last task – MDD – despite the fact that I flew just in the middle of the cross GRRR). 779 points difference on final ranking. Good job Dom!!Battle Laure-Steph

For the girls, it was even more tight as they really reversed their ranking after almost each flight. One time Stephanie, one time Laure. Finally, only 8 points difference on final ranking. Nice fight and nice job also!Battle Suchy-Allemand

Same observation for Jan and Kevin with 193 points difference on final ranking.

Let’s look now at some specific tasks to see which competitors are the best respectively for targets tasks (every tasks involving a physical target and only one marker drop, e.g., FIN, JDG, HWZ, HNH) or FLY-ON tasks.

The following table presents the results only for FON tasks. This inform us on which pilots are the best at choosing a FON and then reaching it of course ! Laure De Coligny is the best FON pilot with an average of 22 meters (3D measuring) for this kind of task, followed by Markus with 26 meters, and by Rokas and myself with 27 meters! Please note that I didn’t count the No Result … It’s interesting to see the pilots of top 10 who aren’t here in the top 10 of FON task. The Bareford family and Kevin Allemand seem not to like this kind of task… Capture d’écran 2014-09-15 à 20.16.14

The following table now presents the results only for “physical targets” tasks. This time I tried to enhance the analysis by excluding the worst result of each pilot. These worst results are in red in the table.  And it appears that worst results of 67% of pilots are on the task#19. This task required to climb at 4500 ft to take the good wind, but only some pilots believed in the piball and tried it! Globally, Rokas is the best at this target game, with an average of 16m, and his worst result 86 meter! The Bareford family takes the 2nd and 3rd places with 18 and 19m. Unsurprisingly, the top 10 is quite the same than the final top 10 ranking.

Capture d’écran 2014-09-14 à 19.08.56

Now we have analyzed results and tasks, we can look at the penalties and their influence on the general ranking. We can see that compared to the world championships in Rio Claro, the penalties haven’t a lot of impact. Only 4 pilots lost one place due to their penalties!

Capture d’écran 2014-09-15 à 21.23.13 As the penalties didn’t had massive effect during this championship, I was surprised to see so many No Results. That’s why I decided to count them, analyze and see the effect. To do that, I decided to replace a No Result by the average score of the competitors. You can see the changes in this table. The changes should not be interpreted at the individual level, but on a global level (if someone looses a place, then someone can benefit from this!). And the result is really interesting! Igor Vertiprakhov (RUS) lost for example 3 places due to 4 no results.

Capture d’écran 2014-09-15 à 21.32.26

 Finally, to close this analysis, you may have a look at the number of tasks won by each competitor. Anders, Kevin, Stephanie and myself, we won 3 tasks each, followed by Laure, Pascal and Laurynas who won 2 tasks each. Surprisingly, our gold and silver winners Dominic and Rokas didn’t won any tasks during the championship! This is a good evidence that only regularity is the path to victory. No matters how brilliant you can be on some single tasks, pilots have to be good every day on every kind of tasks! This wise word will be my last 🙂 I hope you enjoyed this post!

Capture d’écran 2014-09-15 à 21.51.22

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2 thoughts on “Results Analysis World Junior Championship 2014”

  1. Clement,

    thanks for the work, brilliant Analysis.

    Your last “wise word” has been common knowledge for decades, but not necessarily for every pilot!

    Thomas

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